This Misoyaki Eggplant & Tofu recipe is easy and perfect for a delicious weeknight meal!

After sharing my unagi eggplant recipe, I’ve gotten several requests for more eggplant recipes so today I’m going to share with you another one of my favourite ways to cook up eggplant. Say hello to Misoyaki Eggplant and Tofu! This quick and easy miso eggplant tofu stir fry is full of sweet and salty flavour and with the addition of the tofu, makes it satisfying enough a complete meal!

Ingredients

  • Eggplant: I love Japanese eggplant for it’s mild sweetness and because it tends to not have as many seeds. However, it’s quite difficult to find it North America so I like to use Chinese eggplants instead. Of course, you can use your favourite variety of eggplant.
  • Medium firm tofu: You’ll find most recipes recommending to use firm or extra firm tofu, however I like to use traditional/medium firm tofu because the inside stays moist, soft and almost fluffy! Feel free to use firm or extra firm tofu, though.
  • Potato starch: dusting the tofu with potato starch helps achieve that beautiful golden crispy exterior.
  • Sake: Can be omitted if you can not consume alcohol, however please note that the flavour will change slightly.
  • Sugar
  • Vegan Kombu Mentsuyu: Can be substituted with soy sauce.
  • Aji-mirin: Again, can be omitted with you can not consume alcohol. Replace with water and a touch more sugar.
  • Miso paste: I like to use yellow or red miso for this recipe because of its stronger flavour compared to white miso.

How to Make Misoyaki Eggplant & Tofu

  1. Rinse and cut off the top of the eggplant. Then chop the eggplant rangiri-style by rotating the eggplant (see vide) into equal size pieces. Transfer to a bowl of cold salted water and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  2. In the meantime, slice the tofu into bite sized squares. Pat it dry and then coat all sides with potato starch. Over medium high heat, add some oil and cook the tofu on each side until golden brown (about 45-60 seconds per side). Remove from pan.
  3. Drain the eggplant well. Over medium to medium high heat add 1 tbsp of cooking oil to the pan and then add the eggplant. Let eggplant soak up the oil (the eggplant will soak it up relatively quickly). Key point: As soon as the oil is absorbed by the eggplant, flip the them so that the skin side is facing down. This will help maintain the purple colour while still achieving some nice charring. Once the skin side is nice and brown, flip onto the other side and fry until light golden brown. In the meantime, dissolve the miso paste with the mirin. 
  4. Then add the sake, sugar and kombu mentsuyu and swirl the pan around 1-2 times. Add the tofu and let it cook until most of sauce is absorbed by the eggplant and tofu. Turn heat down to medium low and then add in the miso and chili bean paste. Key point: adding miso toward the end will ensure it doesn’t burn and retains its flavour. Swirl the pan and then let it cook for 30-45 seconds to allow the eggplant and tofu to absorb the remaining sauce. Flip the tofu as needed to ensure the sauce coats everything. 
  5. Turn off the heat, transfer to a plate and then garnish with sesame seeds and scallions. Serve with rice or grain of choice and enjoy!

Serving suggestions

This eggplant and tofu dish is delicious served with rice or any grain of choice! Pair with vegan miso soup and another vegetable side dish such as sesame spinach salad or braised lotus root for a complete meal.

How to store

While best served fresh, this dish can be prepped ahead of time for an easy meal prep too. Once cooled, place in a air tight container and keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Re-heat in the microwave for 1 minute or until warmed through.

More delicious eggplant recipes to love:

If you recreate this Misoyaki Eggplant and Tofu recipe let me know how you liked it by leaving a comment and rating below or by tagging me on Instagram @Okonomikitchen, I love seeing all of your tasty recreations!
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Misoyaki Eggplant and Tofu


Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 2 Japanese or 1 large Chinese eggplant
  • 10oz medium firm tofu (280g)
  • potato starch

Misoyaki Sauce

  • 1 tbsp sake
  • 1/2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp mentusyu (15 ml // or soy sauce)
  • 1 tbsp aji mirin
  • 1 tbsp miso paste
  • 12 tsp chili bean paste (10g)

Instructions

  1. Rinse and cut off the top of the eggplant. Then chop the eggplant rangiri-style by rotating the eggplant (see vide) into equal size pieces. Transfer to a bowl of cold salted water and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  2. In the meantime, slice the tofu into bite sized squares. Pat it dry and then coat all sides with potato starch. Over medium high heat, add some oil and cook the tofu on each side until golden brown (about 45-60 seconds per side). Remove from pan.
  3. Drain the eggplant well. Over medium to medium high heat add 1 tbsp of cooking oil to the pan and then add the eggplant. Let eggplant soak up the oil (the eggplant will soak it up relatively quickly). Key point: As soon as the oil is absorbed by the eggplant, flip the them so that the skin side is facing down. This will help maintain the purple colour while still achieving some nice charring. Once the skin side is nice and brown, flip onto the other side and fry until light golden brown. In the meantime, dissolve the miso paste with the mirin. 
  4. Then add the sake, sugar and kombu mentsuyu and swirl the pan around 1-2 times. Add the tofu and let it cook until most of sauce is absorbed by the eggplant and tofu. Turn heat down to medium low and then add in the miso and chili bean paste. Key point: adding miso toward the end will ensure it doesn’t burn and retains its flavour. Swirl the pan and then let it cook for 30-45 seconds to allow the eggplant and tofu to absorb the remaining sauce. Flip the tofu as needed to ensure the sauce coats everything. 
  5. Turn off the heat, transfer to a plate and then garnish with sesame seeds and scallions. Serve with rice or grain of choice and enjoy!

Notes

  • Helpful Equipment:
  • Nutritional Information Disclaimer: Nutrition information is a rough estimate calculated on an online tool (Cronometer). 

SAVE IT FOR LATER! ↓

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Konnichiwa

About Lisa

I'm Lisa, a home cook, recipe developer and founder of Okonomi Kitchen. Here, you'll find a mix of classic and modernized Japanese recipes, and creative, plant-forward meal inspiration using seasonal ingredients. I hope to share more about Japanese cuisine and culture through food and recipes.


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40 Comments

  1. I hated eggplant until I tried “Nasu Dengaku” in Japan. Have loved the combination of eggplant with shiro miso since then 😀

    This would be a great meal today, with a good macro balance – tofu, miso, and eggplant.
    Thank you for sharing the recipe Lisa.

    Komorebi Trail

  2. Absolutely delicious! The flavors of the red miso, mirin, and sake (ingenious!) melded perfectly. This dish even won over my eggplant-hating husband 🙂

    I did take another reviewer’s suggestion of subbing chili garlic paste for the spicy bean paste (didn’t have this one on hand), and I also added some maitaake mushrooms. This will go into my regular rotation – except I will be doubling it next time!

  3. I got my hands on a Chinese eggplant and knew immediately I had to pick one of your recipes to use for it. This misoyaki eggplant and tofu was soooooooo good. The Chinese eggplant has such a gentle flavor. I didn’t have to substitute anything from the recipe. I will definitely be making this again.

  4. Loved this recipe! I don’t usually enjoy eggplant, but my sister made me this and it will definitely be added to my list of recipes to make again!! It was so simple and packed with amazing flavours

    1. Delicious blend of flavors! I used an Italian? Chinese? Globe eggplant that I picked from our garden yesterday. I used unknown firmness kettle style tofu made locally – I didn’t have potato starch, so I just fried it on a cast-iron griddle which crisped it up nicely and then added it. I also did not have sake so I used extra dry sherry instead. And tamari. It was delectable.. Do not neglect to add the scallions and sesame seeds! Yum. I will make it again using different veggies. To be honest I had burned out on eggplant we had so many this year; and this was a fresh new way to eat that I wish I had discovered earlier instead of endless soggy eggplant in soups and Tomato-eggplant bakes. It’s a winner!

  5. I made this after Lisa posted it on Instagram and IT DID NOT DISAPPOINT. I used firm tofu but next time I will try it with soft (where I am they sell soft and medium textured tofu). I also am not a fan of eggplant so I added zucchini and it worked just as well!! I also want to see how this recipe would taste if I added sweet potato noodles! The endless possibilities to build on this~